The New Albany Women's Network will donate the proceeds of its annual fall fashion show to 1Girl, a local nonprofit organization that teaches leadership skills to middle school girls in at-risk areas.

The New Albany Women's Network will donate the proceeds of its annual fall fashion show to 1Girl, a local nonprofit organization that teaches leadership skills to middle school girls in at-risk areas.

The women's network board of directors reviewed 18 applications before choosing 1Girl as the beneficiary of the Nov. 14 fundraiser.

The 16th annual show is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Jefferson Country Club, 7271 Jefferson Meadow Drive in Blacklick.

Reservations are being accepted online.

"It's incredible to work with women who are so passionate. The New Albany Women's Network supports women and children and it's an honor to work with such a well-established organization that has done so much good in the past for our community," said Shelby Kretz, one of the founders of 1Girl.

Kretz was a senior at the Ohio State University in the fall of 2012 when she and two friends, Aditi Bansal and Sheila Maina, researched organizations supporting middle school girls and "did not find an intensive, leadership-development curriculum being targeting at girls in our community in low-income communities and failing school districts," she said.

The trio founded 1Girl and completed a pilot program in the summer of 2013 by teaching at-risk girls public-speaking skills, creative problem solving, critical thinking, goal setting and conflict resolution, according to the 1Girl website, 1girl.net.

In the first year of the program in 2014, 1Girl served 100 girls in grades 5 to 8, providing facilitators to teach its curriculum at local churches, schools, recreation areas and summer camps, "anywhere kids spend after school and summer hours," Kretz said.

"We provide the volunteers, materials and curriculum and they provide the girls and the space," Kretz said.

The course is taught for one hour, two days a week and college students trained to teach the curriculum run the sessions for eight to 12 weeks.

Kretz said 1Girl has self-sustaining chapters at Ohio State, Eastern Michigan University and the University of Toledo, where chapter members "fundraise to pay for materials for the program and recruit volunteers."

Kretz said in 2015, 1Girl is on track to triple its connection with young women. Its chapters are slated to work with 300 girls and the organization's leaders are trying to increase the number of chapters at colleges and universities by working with students at Ashland University, Bowling Green State University, the University of Findlay and the University of Southern California.

Kretz said she is working to expand 1Girl programs in California, where she moved recently to take a job working in education.