New Albany-Plain Township Historical Society members recently showed local third-graders the amenities they might take for granted didn't always exist.

New Albany-Plain Township Historical Society members recently showed local third-graders the amenities they might take for granted didn't always exist.

"It would be harder (living in the early 1900s) because you didn't have technology and you didn't have gas stations," said 8-year-old Elizabeth Anderson. "You didn't have cars to drive around."

Jayden Jones, 8, said he learned early residents of New Albany had no microwave ovens and people cooked over a wood fire.

"It would have been harder because you couldn't just turn on the light or the oven," he said.

The historical society members visited the students Dec. 3 and 8 at the New Albany-Plain Local 2-8 building to teach them about local life in the early 1900s.

Third-grade teacher Sarah Carson said she worked with the historical society on the visit to coincide with an educational unit on the community.

She said the students are learning about New Albany and its history, so bringing in local historians made sense.

"It all ties in to what we're doing," she said.

Students spent the two days rotating among stations that included: area geography by retired teacher and local environmentalist Bill Resch; learning in a one-room schoolhouse from historical society member Richard Whitelock; community history from local historian Dennis Keesee; and daily life in the early 1900s from Donna Able and Richard Trotter of the Slate Run Living Historical Farm in Canal Winchester.

Whitelock told them that in the early 1900s, teachers spanked students with sticks and modern toilet paper hadn't been invented, a fact which brought groans from the students Dec. 8.

Trotter showed students broom corn, a crop used to make brooms.

Able told students how people would trade for food they couldn't grow, like coffee.

Carson said the students are required to complete a project as part of the community unit. She said they would choose a topic to research and use their individual talents -- painting, writing or something else -- to create a poster or a skit to illustrate what they learned.

She said historical society members and the other speakers would be invited back to view the projects.

Carson said she also hopes to link the projects to Founders Day in May, which celebrates the city's founding in 1837.

"The kids already are getting excited about their projects," Carson said after the Dec. 8 program. "Any time you can make history come alive, it gives them a jumping-off point.

"Bringing history alive makes it interesting for them."