Last week, zoning attorney Jill S. Tangeman pitched a 61-acre Ulry Road rezoning proposal to Northland Community Council development-committee members for the third time in the past five years.

Last week, zoning attorney Jill S. Tangeman pitched a 61-acre Ulry Road rezoning proposal to Northland Community Council development-committee members for the third time in the past five years.

The result: Strike three.

The 17 voting members on hand unanimously recommended that Columbus officials should reject the plan for 96 condominiums, a 204-unit apartment complex and an assisted-living facility with 90 beds, according to committee chairman Dave Paul.

In her presentation, Tangeman said her clients, Metro Development and McCorkle Soaring Eagles, had bowed to the will of nearby residents by cutting back a proposal for 120 condos, 244 apartments and 100 assisted-living beds.

They didn't bow deeply enough, according to those who spoke against the request at the committee meeting.

"This is a little distressing," said Suzanne Harnichar, a member of a committee of residents that had been negotiating with the attorney and the property owner for several months over the rezoning request.

Harnichar said those in the working group thought they were still in the middle of negotiations when they learned the issue was on the NCC's agenda and is scheduled to come before the Columbus Development Commission on June 9. The development commission makes recommendations on zoning changes to Columbus City Council, which has the final say on all zoning changes.

Tangeman denied she told Columbus officials negotiations were concluded and suggested they were the ones who pushed the proposal forward.

Steve Winiecki, another member of the committee of residents, said the latest counterproposal was for 75 condos and 180 apartments. The group had no problem with a 100-bed assisted-living center, he said.

"We're all upset about this," resident Dee Grindley said. "We have seen what ill zoning does, the impact on neighborhoods. It destroys neighborhoods."

"I am of the opinion there have not been good-faith negotiations, particularly in the last month," Royal Morse said, noting that on two prior occasions the development committee had voted unanimously against the rezoning.

"Really, nothing has changed," said Mark Irwin. "Why hasn't it changed? It's because this is a profit-driven initiative."

"It would annihilate life as we know it on Ulry Road," Debbie Donsker said.

"To me, the apartments must go," said Lewis Muhlestein.

"You can put lipstick on a pig -- it's still a pig," Martha Vermaaten said.

In coming to their unanimous decision, Paul said, committee members felt the counterproposal of the residents had been given a lot of thought, was reasonable and still economically sound for the property owner and would-be developers.

"They had tried basically to offer a reasonable compromise, which the applicant did not reciprocate," Paul said. "They really felt that they should stick by their original position. Our committee joined them in that.

"There just wasn't a sense that there was a sufficient level of compromise that our committee could support."