Choosing the top-five stories of 2016 in New Albany isn't as easy as it sounds, but reporter Sarah Sole has compiled the best topics the ThisWeek New Albany News covered throughout the year.

Choosing the top-five stories of 2016 in New Albany isn't as easy as it sounds, but reporter Sarah Sole has compiled the best topics the ThisWeek New Albany News covered throughout the year.

Here's what made the cut, in no particular order:

Three's not a crowd

New Albany jumped on the tech bandwagon this year when the data center built by Amazon subsidiary Vadata opened in October.

The facility on Smith's Mill Road is part of an increasing Amazon presence in central Ohio that includes two other recently constructed data centers in Hilliard and Dublin and two fulfillment centers in Etna and Obetz.

Changes at the top

The New Albany-Plain Local School District experienced a changing of the guard, as new Superintendent Michael Sawyers, formerly the district's chief of operations and strategic development, took the reins from April Domine, who left for a leadership role with Gahanna Christian Academy.

A true rarity

Let 2016 be known as the year when New Albany expanded its residential options to include something other than single-family homes with garages and ample yards.

Yes, 130 apartments are coming to New Albany's village center by spring. They will be developed by Kaufman Development in partnership with New Albany Co. and the Daimler Group.

New Albany has only one other rental community within city limits.

In the money

New Albany residents decided they were OK with shelling out a bit more green to improve their parks system.

A 0.75-mill permanent replacement levy was approved in November for the New Albany-Plain Local Joint Parks District. Parks officials said it was needed for repairs across 200 acres of parkland.

Pay (less) to play

On the subject of green, parents of students participating in extracurricular activities took a smaller hit to their wallets this year after New Albany-Plain Local in May reduced its pay-to-participate fees.

High school athletics fees were decreased from $625 to $425, and middle school fees were reduced from $425 to $225.