Authorities shuttered an after-hours club on Karl Road at 7 a.m. Friday, Jan. 30, after Franklin County Environmental Judge Daniel R. Hawkins granted a temporary restraining order declaring the place a public nuisance.

Authorities shuttered an after-hours club on Karl Road at 7 a.m. Friday, Jan. 30, after Franklin County Environmental Judge Daniel R. Hawkins granted a temporary restraining order declaring the place a public nuisance.

City Attorney Richard C. Pfeiffer Jr. sought the court order against the LaRue Banquet Facility, 5796 Karl Road, its owner and several employees in the wake of at least one shooting death at the club as well as numerous instances of assault, illegal drug sales, selling alcohol without a license and one case on Feb. 22 last year in which a female patron was "briefly kidnapped by an individual … she met inside the premises," according to complaint.

The filing also details the owner's alleged lack of response to certified letters and follow-up telephone calls from Columbus police officer Scott Clinger, community liaison to one of the precincts covering the Northland area.

In these communications, according to both the complaint and the temporary restraining order, Clinger detailed the number of shootings and other crimes dating back to January 2014 that officers found when called to the LaRue Banquet Facility, as well as more recent instances of undercover informants purchasing alcohol and marijuana inside the club.

Ohio Department of Commerce Division of Liquor Control officials confirmed Jan. 15 that the LaRue Banquet Facility does not have a license to sell alcohol, according to the complaint.

Hawkins wrote that the city attorney's complaint "established clear and convincing evidence that the illegal activity occurring at the premises at 5796 Karl Road … continues to cause irreparable harm to the community and that the property is a nuisance …"

Clinger and officer Larry Geis, another Northland community liaison, have launched a campaign to have a section about violent acts added to the state statute on public nuisances. The current law, they have said, gives more weight to such things as alcohol sales, illegal drug purchases and prostitution than to assaults, shootings and even murder.

State Rep. David Leland (D-Clintonville) announced Jan. 29 that he will sponsor the change requested by Geis and Clinger.

"This legislation will give police officers and code enforcement officials across the state of Ohio one additional tool to fight crime and to strengthen our neighborhoods," Leland said in the announcement.