The North Side Health Advisory Committee will sponsor a screening of a documentary May 19 that focuses on post-traumatic stress disorder among children, both refugees from war-torn lands and those growing up in high-crime neighborhoods in the United States.

The North Side Health Advisory Committee will sponsor a screening of a documentary May 19 that focuses on post-traumatic stress disorder among children, both refugees from war-torn lands and those growing up in high-crime neighborhoods in the United States.

Wounded Places, one episode of a series about early childhood development, will be shown at 6 p.m. in the library at Northland High School, 1919 Northcliff Drive.

The library can hold more than 100 people, and Trevor Secord, advisory committee co-chairman, is urging others on the panel to encourage as many people as possible to attend -- "so we can have a good conversation," he said at last week's meeting.

Representatives of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University will be on hand to facilitate conversations among attendees sparked by the episode, titled The Raising of America: Early Childhood and the Future of Our Nation.

The series has a total of five episodes, some of which are being shown by other advisory committees around the city, according to Sarah Potter.

The Columbus Public Health employee is the facilitator for the panels. She said the North Side Health Advisory Committee members chose Wounded Places in particular.

"I think it's a really good and unique ability to have a good conversation," Secord said. "We'd love to have as many people as possible."

"Recent studies underscore repeatedly how a child's earliest surroundings and interactions shape the developing brain, building the foundations for lifelong emotional, intellectual and even physical health and development," according to the website for the series. "Exposure to a nurturing or adverse environment in the early years affects how we think, feel and relate to others as we age, our capacities for empathy, impulse control and even love."

The episode that will be shown May 19 focuses on three young people who live in Oakland and Philadelphia who deal with hyper-vigilance, sudden rages, nightmares, inability to trust and difficulty concentrating in school.

The series website says their symptoms look a lot like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, "but they are not combat vets and for them there is no 'post.' "

The screening is free and open to the public.