Two countywide levies and an Olentangy schools levy-bond issue will be on local ballots May 3.

Two countywide levies and an Olentangy schools levy-bond issue will be on local ballots May 3.

Genoa Township voters will decide a road levy. No candidates are on the ballot.

Olentangy Local Schools

Olentangy schools placed a combined 7.9-mill operating levy and $24.4 million bond issue on the ballot.

The operating levy would cost homeowners an additional $241.94 annually per $100,000 of property value. The average residential property value in the district is $262,759, according to the Delaware County auditor's office.

District officials are calling the bond issue "no new millage." The district would restructure its current bond debt, delaying repayment of the debt, district treasurer Becky Jenkins said.

The levy would raise $25.2 million annually, district officials have said. Operating levies pay for the various daily expenses of running the district, including employee costs, building utilities, supplies and vehicle fuel.

The bond issue would provide $24.4-million to pay for the district's 16th elementary school, technology equipment, buses, capital improvement projects and textbooks.

Residential property owners in the school district currently pay $1,357 per $100,000 of home value annually to the district, said Shari Baker of the Delaware County auditor's office. The levy-bond issue would increase that to $1,648.

Genoa Township road levy

Genoa Township's three-year, 0.7-mill streets, roads and bridges renewal levy would replace the current levy expiring Dec. 31.

The levy would cost property owners $21.44 per $100,000 of residential value annually, the same as the existing levy.

The average residential property value in the township is $297,649, according to the auditor's office.

It would raise about $663,442 annually for the township. The levy is the department's primary source of revenue.

911 renewal levy

Delaware County's 911 five-year, 0.45-mill renewal levy would replace the current levy expiring Dec. 31. If approved, the new levy would cost property owners the same as the expiring levy, $13.68 per $100,000 of residential valuation a year. The levy is the primary revenue funding countywide 911 emergency dispatching; cell phone location service upgrades; dispatcher training for police, fire and medical responders; county, state and federal interoperable communications; and maintenance of current levels of technology.

That levy generates about $2.6 million annually in property taxes.

The countywide 911 system has an annual budget of $3.4 million, which includes all expenses, such as technology for the 911 call center and radio system, the code red emergency and weather alert warning systems, and salaries, benefits and training for employees.

The average residential property value in the county is $220,603, according to the auditor's office.

DCBDD replacement levy

The Delaware County Board of Developmental Disabilities' five-year, 2.1-mill replacement levy would replace the current levy expiring Dec. 31.

The current levy is collected at 2.09 mills.

The replacement levy would be collected at 2.1 mills.

The replacement levy would mean an owner of a $100,000 home would pay a few cents more annually in taxes for DCBDD than the $64.26 paid last year. That amount would be $64.31 per $100,000 of assessed value each year.

The new levy would generate about $13.7 million annually and provide about 82 percent of the board's operating revenue.