Orange Township trustees last week rejected a plan calling for 32 condo units at the corner of South Old State Road and Abbey Knoll Drive.

Orange Township trustees last week rejected a plan calling for 32 condo units at the corner of South Old State Road and Abbey Knoll Drive.

Trustees voted unanimously March 18 against rezoning the 16-acre site northeast of the intersection to allow for condos. Trustees cited concerns over the number of units on the site and the number of variances from the zoning code the developer sought.

Joel Rhoades, vice president and general counsel for Dublin-based Epcon Communities, said the only way for the company to address the trustees' concerns was to "drastically cut" the number of units planned. He said the firm studied the idea of reducing the number of units, but ultimately rejected the idea.

"We got to 27 (units)," he said. "The problem with that is, the 27 homes are not profitable for us to build on the site."

He added that it might not be feasible for a condo association to successfully operate with support from 27 units.

Trustee Rob Quigley said he was disappointed Epcon did not bring a scaled-back plan before the board.

"You do have a history of doing good developments in the township, but, in this case, I don't think it's going to work," he told Epcon officials.

Trustee Lisa Knapp said she didn't feel comfortable supporting such a high-density development at a site that features two large ponds.

"I don't feel that there's a lot of usable green space," she said.

Knapp said Epcon is a "very good company," adding she hopes it continues to seek out development opportunities in the township.

The board did not take public comment on the submission because it had not changed since a previous meeting.

Rhoades cited the demand for condos in the township as one of the reasons he thought the trustees should support his company's plan. He said Epcon would not be the last developer looking to build condominiums in the township on sites not currently zoned for that use.

"There's a tremendous and growing need in the township for empty-nester housing," he said.