A bill inspired by Delaware County that aims to eliminate the possibility of double taxation for 911 services has passed the Ohio House and Senate.

A bill inspired by Delaware County that aims to eliminate the possibility of double taxation for 911 services has passed the Ohio House and Senate.

The Delaware County Emergency Communications 911 Center receives the majority of its funding from a 0.45-mill property-tax levy that was renewed in 2011. The levy, which generates about $2.25 million annually, is set to expire at the end of the year.

When county officials researched levy possibilities last year, questions arose about the portions of Columbus, Dublin and Westerville that extend into Delaware County. All three cities have separate 911 systems that provide service to their residents regardless of their county.

Residents in those cities have never voted on or paid for the countywide 911 levy, but the Delaware County Prosecutor's Office determined existing law would require the county to tax all households in the county if a new levy was approved.

County officials took their concerns to Ohio Rep. Andrew Brenner (R-Powell), who sponsored legislation to eliminate the possibility of residents paying taxes to support separate city and county 911 systems. The legislation also prevents residents who pay taxes toward a city 911 system from voting on countywide 911 levies.

Patrick Brandt, Delaware County's director of emergency communications, said in a statement that the issue could have caused problems for any potential levy campaign.

"Without House Bill 277, 911 funding for Delaware County could have been in grave danger due to the amount of 'no' votes we would have received in the areas that would be double-taxed," he said.

The Ohio House voted unanimously in favor of the bill in April. The Ohio Senate on May 25 -- the last day before adjourning for the summer -- voted unanimously in favor of the bill.

The bill now goes to Gov. John Kasich's office for his signature.

Brenner said he was "ecstatic" the measure made it through the House and the Senate. He said taxpayers in Delaware County are not the only potential beneficiaries of the law.

"This will actually apply statewide and I believe there are other jurisdictions in similar situations," he said.

Delaware County officials must meet an Aug. 10 deadline to put a levy on the November ballot.

Brandt has said the county 911 board likely would make a recommendation this month on a potential levy request to county commissioners, who must approve adding the measure to the ballot. He said the details of the request have not been finalized because officials were waiting to see if the legislation would be approved.