Spring, also know as "pothole season" in central Ohio, is upon area motorists as they set about either dodging the pesky craters or bracing for the impact of a direct hit.

Spring, also know as "pothole season" in central Ohio, is upon area motorists as they set about either dodging the pesky craters or bracing for the impact of a direct hit.

The end result of hitting a pothole just right can mean a deflated tire, front end alignment damage or worse.

State Route 256 in Pickerington is easily the most noticeable roadway as far as potholes go, but city crews have been out hot patching the road, which is scheduled to be resurfaced as part of an upcoming large-scale roadway improvement project.

Crews from the city and the Ohio Department of Transportation were out fixing one of the worst hit areas, a section of state Route 256 underneath the Interstate 70 overpass, Friday, March 20.

"(State Route) 256 is very bad, and ... the things that make it that way are the speed and the volume of traffic," said Scott Tourville, Pickerington city engineer.

Tourville said the city of Pickerington certainly has other roadways with severe potholes, "but they are not traveled nearly as much and at much slower speeds, so motorists typically avoid them."

"On 256, they are much more challenging to miss," Tourville said.

He said potholes are so bad this year primarily because of the brutal sub-zero cold winter.

Water underneath the road surface coupled with heavy traffic and the freezing and thawing process leads to distressed asphalt, Tourville said.

"(It's) the age of the roadway and the weather," he said.

"This time of year the freeze/thaw cycles are really taking a toll on area roadways.

"And it's not just this area, but all over central Ohio," Tourville said.

"Older infrastructure just doesn't hold up as well as newer roadways do," he said.

As part of the upcoming state Route 256 Safety Project administered by ODOT, Tourville said all of 256 located within Pickerington city limits will be resurfaced by fall of this year, which should result in a smoother ride next spring.

Violet Township Engineer Greg Butcher said his crews have been working hard to fix the township's potholes.

"We've dedicated 75 percent of staff to filling potholes," Butcher said at the Violet Township Board of Trustees meeting March 18.

"We're aggressively going after them and really working hard to get that accomplished," he said.

To report potholes in the city of Pickerington, call the city's Utility Complex at 614-833-2292.

Crews will attempt to patch potholes within two working days after the problem is reported.

To report potholes in Violet Township, send an e-mail to: engineer@violet.oh.us.