In late 2013, Violet Township sought input from a consultant about whether to place a road maintenance levy on the ballot. However, it was decided that the timing wasn't right and the township pursued a successful 3.8-mill fire levy instead in May 2014.

In late 2013, Violet Township sought input from a consultant about whether to place a road maintenance levy on the ballot. However, it was decided that the timing wasn't right and the township pursued a successful 3.8-mill fire levy instead in May 2014.

Violet Township officials say the timing is now optimal to seek voter approval of 1.5-mill road levy and one has been placed on the March primary election ballot.

The suburban township operates on a shoestring 2016 budget of $275,000 a year, which officials say is simply not enough to keep pace with the cost of materials and the daily wear and tear from increased traffic.

"In recent years, Violet Township, like many other local governments, has suffered a significant loss of revenue from (many) sources," said John Eisel, Violet Township director of operations .

He pointed to the elimination of the Tangible Personal Property Tax (TPP) in 2010, which he said provided the township with $11,800 annually.

Eisel said elimination of the Estate Tax in 2013 further drained township resources. The revenue derived from that funding source was "as much as $617,803 annually," he said.

He said Violet Township also experienced substantial cuts in funding through the Local Government Fund (LGF) in 2012, which was instead redirected from local communities to the state of Ohio to assist in balancing its own budget.

"The LGF provided Violet Township with as much as $232,000, and has been reduced by $100,000," Eisel said.

"These cuts in funding have directly affected our ability to supplement our road improvement program," he said.

According to Violet Township officials, the 1.5-mill road levy would cost a township property owner $52.50 per $100,000 valuation.

"These additional funds are necessary for us to have the resources to maintain the 105 miles of roadway infrastructure," Eisel said.

He said a comprehensive township road maintenance program involves "sealing cracks, filling potholes, installing new blacktop, (in some cases) applying chip seal, snow and ice removal, salt application, street sign maintenance, culvert and bridge maintenance (and) right of way mowing and maintenance."

Eisel said lack of funding to maintain township roads "affects transportation, home values, the attractiveness of the community and somewhere down the line it will affect safety."

He said this is the first time in Violet Township's history it has gone to the voters to seek voted millage for road maintenance.