Reynoldsburg police stepped up traffic control efforts recently by installing "target enforcement signs" and pavement markings to remind drivers not to exceed the 25 mph speed limits on Graham Road, Rosehill Road and a section of Lancaster Avenue.

Reynoldsburg police stepped up traffic control efforts recently by installing "target enforcement signs" and pavement markings to remind drivers not to exceed the 25 mph speed limits on Graham Road, Rosehill Road and a section of Lancaster Avenue.

Sgt. Mark Moser said residents' complaints prompted the Motor Unit's increased enforcement on these streets and in other areas of the city, such as Hilltop Avenue, west of Brice Road.

"We are not driven to write more tickets or meet a quota," he said. "We primarily respond to problems that the community brings to our attention."

He said the "safe and efficient movement of vehicles and pedestrians using city streets" is the main mission of the Reynoldsburg Division of Police Motor Unit.

Target enforcement signs were installed on Lancaster Avenue at East Main Street and on Graham Road.

"My intent is to temporarily install the signs at locations where the unit receives traffic complaints," Moser said. "It is one way we are trying to put motorists on notice that we are stepping up our enforcement efforts in a particular area.

"I hope the signs and an increased officer presence will result in voluntary compliance of traffic laws, both while the signs are posted and after they are moved to another location," he said.

He said the length of time the signs remain at a location depends on the number of complaints received.

"I plan to have more signs made so we can post them at multiple complaint locations throughout the city," he said.

Even more noticeable than the signs might be the 8-foot-long pavement markers installed last week on Graham Road, where Reynoldsburg officers issued 322 traffic citations in a 10-month period this year and 94 warnings between July and October.

Moser said the pavement markers were installed on the northbound side of the road, but the markers for the southbound lanes were damaged during shipment. Once replacements arrive, markers will be placed in the southbound lanes.

"The markings, which are like giant decals, cost $700 and each letter or number is 8 feet long," he said. "The reason I recommended the markings on Graham is because more traffic citations and warnings are issued to drivers on that road than on any other street in the city."

Moser said the department also receives the most complaints from Graham Road residents.

"The complaints are almost all for speed violations and an occasional truck route violation," he said.

Moser said both the target enforcement signs and the pavement markers are an inexpensive way to address those complaints.

"Again, we are hoping for voluntary compliance from drivers," he said.

Moser said he knows from personal experience that the pavement markers are effective.

"Recently, I was traveling out of state and driving on a road similar to Graham -- a residential street connecting two main roads -- and I didn't see the speed limit signs, but the speed limit pavement markings caught my attention," he said.

He said the department has already received positive feedback about the pavement markings and a request from a resident in another neighborhood asking for them on her street.

Moser said Rosehill Road between East Livingston and East Main Street is another heavily traveled street where officers "work aggressively" because of the number of complaints.

Between January and October, officers issued 170 traffic citations to drivers on that area of Rosehill Road and 63 traffic warnings between July and October at that location.