Sim Man 36 was one of the big hits at Reynoldsburg's (HS)2 Academy's Community Health Fair March 3, because who wouldn't love a life-size mannequin who breathes, sweats, blinks, talks and even complains he is feeling bad?

Sim Man 36 was one of the big hits at Reynoldsburg's (HS)2 Academy's Community Health Fair March 3, because who wouldn't love a life-size mannequin who breathes, sweats, blinks, talks and even complains he is feeling bad?

The mannequin was stretched out on a table at the health fair in the Reynoldsburg High School field house, controlled with a laptop computer by Mount Carmel Health simulation coordinator Curtis Golden.

Golden said the man-sized simulator is used in Academy classes to teach CPR and to demonstrate other medical techniques.

"Reynoldsburg was the first high school we've brought Sim Man 36 to -- we bring him to a lot of colleges and to fire stations and other places for emergency medical training," he said. "He has a pulse and can also sweat and cry."

The Health Sciences and Human Services Academy's Health Fair drew a number of local vendors and featured food samples from Bibibop Asian Fusion Restaurant, student presentations by the bodies and bioethics classes, representatives from Nationwide Children's Hospital, Mount Carmel Health and a number of local businesses and organizations.

The event included vision and blood pressure checks, fitness activities, wellness education and student presentations about concussions, hypertension and bioethics discussions, such as, "Should marijuana be legalized?" and information for and against physician-assisted suicide for terminally ill patients.

Officer James Triplett, from the Reynoldsburg Police Division's Motor Unit, said he was there to "spread the word about the texting while driving law and other reminders for students and parents."

(HS)2 Academy Principal Dawn McCloud said the students set up 60 tables for vendors and student presentations.

"We wanted the community to see what our students are learning and talking about in classes like the bodies class and our bioethics classes," she said. "We have students giving both points of view for pro-life and pro-choice, for example.

"We also wanted parents to see what resources are available for them within our community," she said.

She said the academy curriculum uses TPBL, or trans-disciplinary problem-based learning, linking health care classes to basic core classes.

Language arts teacher Jen Kapustka and ESL coordinator Lauren Christman organized the health fair.

"Being one of the only health high schools in the area, we wanted to take what we were learning and pour that out into the community," Kapustka said. "It's a good way to engage parents and help them see what their kids are working on every day."

Junior Sydney Stephens manned the "bodies" booth, showing the skeletons on which students add plastic muscles, arteries and veins and organs, as they study human anatomy.

"We make a book that explains how all the parts of the body work, with 360 pages," she said. "We try to explain what our bodies do using skeletons and other visuals."

Stephens said she would like to study medicine in college and eventually become a pediatrician or obstetrician.

Michelle Glanzman and Traci Powell demonstrated the use of essential oils at the doTERRA booth. Glanzman said doterra means "gift of the earth."

"Essential oils are not new; in fact, they were used in ancient China and also noted in the Bible," she said. "The oils are more mainstream now and people are learning that they offer effective ways to heal your body naturally.

"Oils can help emotional needs or even cuts and bruises," she said.

McCloud said she wants to continue the health fair on an annual basis.

"We think it could be a valuable resource for the community each year," she said.