The high school academies in the Reynoldsburg school district give incoming freshmen a number of career-guided pathways -- but what happens if enrollment swells at one campus and declines at the other?

The high school academies in the Reynoldsburg school district give incoming freshmen a number of career-guided pathways -- but what happens if enrollment swells at one campus and declines at the other?

Dealing with those disparities will be the focus of two "town hall" meetings in April.

The first, at 7 p.m. April 5, will be held at the Reynoldsburg Summit Performing Arts Center, 8579 Summit Road.

The second meeting at 7 p.m., April 7 is scheduled at the Performing Arts Center, 6699 E. Livingston Ave.

Board member Debbie Dunlap posted the meeting information on two popular community Facebook pages, Raider Strong We Care and FFT (Families For Teachers).

"Everyone is invited to attend to get informed and have your opinion heard," she said.

Board of Education President Joe Begeny said enrollment at Reynoldsburg's Summit Road campus, which houses eSTEM Academy and Encore Academy, could be over capacity by next school year. That building opened in 2011.

The high school building on East Livingston Avenue, which houses BELL and (HS)2 academies, is considerably older. It opened in 1961 but has been remodeled extensively, though, most recently to accommodate the Columbus State Community College Learning Center and the Mount Carmel Health Station.

Begeny said 72 percent of incoming freshmen have selected the Summit Road campus instead of the East Livingston campus for the 2016-17 school year.

"If they all go into that campus, we would have 1,399 students at Summit, which would be 199 above capacity," he said.

He said only 28 percent of incoming freshmen chose the East Livingston campus, which would mean about 780 students would attend that high school.

"We have a number of responsibilities here," he said. "We have a responsibility to the community and the taxpayers to make sure money is being spent wisely, and to students; we have to make sure their lives are not disrupted, as much as possible."

Begeny said the board would look at all options to establish short-term and long-term goals for the high school academies.

"It is the middle of March," he said. "Scheduling is already underway for next school year. A lot of options have been discussed, some good and some not so good.

"These are things we are going to have to deal with as a school board," he said.

All of the options will be presented to the community at the town hall meetings, he said.

"We want both campuses represented and the public to look at all the options on the table," Begeny said.

He said long-term goals would look at "the sustainability of how our high schools are set up."

"We have great programs at both the Summit and Livingston campuses, but maybe we don't do a good job of advertising the academies, since there is such a disparity between one campus and another," he said.

On the Summit campus, eSTEM Academy is one of 15 designated science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) schools in the state of Ohio, while Encore Academy offers specialized programming in arts, communication and design.

On the Livingston campus, the Business, Education, Leadership and Law (BELL) Academy provides degree and certificate programs in partnership with Columbus State Community College, while (HS)2, the Health, Sciences and Human Services Academy, also an Ohio-designated STEM platform school, is one of two in the state specializing in medical fields. Among its college and career pathways are bio-medical engineering, health information technology and emergency medical technician.

"Because we are just a few months away from a new school year starting, we have to deal with this problem," Begeny said. "We want to communicate with everyone and keep this an open process in dealing with the enrollment issue at both campuses."