Some who attend a exhibition of figurative ceramics, by 13 female artists, that interpret what equality means in today's world may have preconceived notions of what they will see.

Some who attend a exhibition of figurative ceramics, by 13 female artists, that interpret what equality means in today's world may have preconceived notions of what they will see.

The Ohio Craft Museum's new exhibition will offer some surprises, said Janis Wunderlich, an Upper Arlington artist who curated the show.

"Equality" will be on view Sunday, Feb. 7, through March 26 at the museum, 1665 W. Fifth Ave. The show's opening reception from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday will include a talk by Wunderlich at 3 p.m.

"We wanted the artists to have the freedom to interpret equality however they chose to," Wunderlich said. "This show is a wonderful visual response to what equality means in all sorts of areas.

"You may come in with your own baggage or interpretation and find yourself questioning what equality means to you," she said.

Although all the artists are women, the works they've created touch on more than just gender equality, Ohio Craft Museum Director Betty Talbott said.

"In some pieces, they are looking at equality for children and some are examining racial life in the United States," she said.

"Equality" will feature the work of Ohio artists Juliellen Byrne of Columbus and Jenny Mendes of Cleveland.

The work of Linda Ganstrom is sure to draw visitors' attention, Talbott said.

For her Through the Looking Glass Ceiling, the Florida artist created three life-sized figures representing characters from Alice in Wonderland.

Most of the participants, including Wunderlich, are members of the Women Ceramic Sculptors, an artist's group whose members use clay to express themselves on social issues.

The group also helps in finding venues for its member artists to show their work, Wunderlich said.

"It's easier, especially for women artists, to find places collectively where they can exhibit their work rather than trying to do so as individual artists," she said.

Working in clay is an engaging practice, Wunderlich said.

"The thing that draws me to being a ceramic artist is just being able to work with my hands in the clay, getting them dirty pushing, pulling and manipulating the clay," she said.

It takes about a month to create one of her pieces in a series of processes, Wunderlich said.

"Clay has a voice of its own and it doesn't always do what you want it to," she said. "If it's too soft, it sags; when it gets hard, it can crack.

"You're having a conversation with the clay while you're working with it," Wunderlich said. "There are a lot of words spoken in that conversation."

Along with "Equality," the craft museum will present "Northeast Ohio Jewelry," featuring contemporary jewelry by David and Roberta Williamson, Michael Romanik and Catherine Butler.

The Ohio Craft Museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 1 to 4 p.m. weekends. Admission and parking are free.