Upper Arlington police and fire officials are reaching out to the public in hopes of a receiving a tip that could solve an arson from last spring.

Upper Arlington police and fire officials are reaching out to the public in hopes of a receiving a tip that could solve an arson from last spring.

At 3:20 a.m. May 24, flames swept through a four-bedroom, 2,192-square-foot house at 4510 Sussex Drive, destroying it and leading to its demolition.

No one was home at the time. Investigators said the house had been rented and its last tenants were in the process of moving out when the fire struck.

The cause of the fire has since been ruled an arson, and local police and fire officials are turning to the public to help them solve who set it.

"There's nobody we've found that saw the fire being set," said Lt. Christopher Zimmer of the Upper Arlington Fire Division. "If there was somebody that saw something, that's what we're looking for."

Safety officials are asking anyone with information about the fire to call Upper Arlington Police Division Detective Matt Smith at 614-583-5150. An anonymous crime-reporting form also can be submitted at uaoh.net under the "Services/Action Center" link.

A day after the city publicized a "request for information" about the arson, the police department had not received any tips.

"I haven't heard one thing from the public," Smith said Dec. 2.

Information that leads to an arrest and conviction could result in the tipster receiving a reward of up to $10,000 from the Ohio Blue Ribbon Arson Committee and Central Ohio Crime Stoppers.

The property's owner also is willing to match that reward, Zimmer said.

"We've interviewed people," he said. "We're at a point where we're looking for information."

According to the Franklin County Auditor's Office, the Sussex Drive property is owned by Fairfax Homes Inc.

The house was built in 1966; its 2015 market value was $319,000.

Zimmer wouldn't say how the May 24 fire was started or why it's been ruled arson, citing the ongoing investigation.

"We have information that leads us to believe it was an intentionally set fire," he said. "We're confident it was intentionally set."

Neither the city's police nor fire departments had been called to the house for any problems prior to the May 24 fire, Zimmer said. He added there hadn't been any criminal activity of note in the neighborhood before the fire.

Zimmer said arsons are rare in Upper Arlington. He noted that no other houses or buildings in the city have been intentionally set on fire since at least 2009.

"We're looking for any kind of tips -- information that would lead us to pursue any suspects," Zimmer said. "We canvassed the neighborhood, but there might be somebody we missed or ... maybe someone has talked about it since then.

"Unfortunately, we don't have more to go on."

nellis@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekNate