Construction on the third phase of school buildings in South-Western City Schools' Ohio Facilities Construction Commission project is moving at a faster pace than the first two stages, according to project officials.

Construction on the third phase of school buildings in South-Western City Schools' Ohio Facilities Construction Commission project is moving at a faster pace than the first two stages, according to project officials.

All of the district's new buildings will be open and occupied by fall 2016, said Mike Dingeldein of SHP Leading Design.

Buildings in the first two phases already are occupied.

Dingeldein and Todd Thackery of SHP provided an update on the construction project at the Nov. 16 school board meeting.

The work at three Phase 3 sites -- Prairie Lincoln, Richard Avenue and West Franklin elementary schools -- is ahead of where previous phases were at this time, Dingeldein said.

Work on the new Highland Park Elementary School building started six months behind the other Phase 3 buildings because its students attended the new Bolton Crossing Elementary School this year.

Highland Park students will move into their new school and Bolton Crossing, which will replace North Franklin Elementary School, will officially open in fall 2016.

"A big push for the Phase 3 buildings was to get them enclosed quickly so we were ahead for the winter," Thackery said.

The brick work on Prairie Lincoln, Richard Avenue and West Franklin should be completed by the end of November or early December and the interior of the buildings are expected to be completed in the spring, he said.

Despite starting six months later, the progress made at Highland Park is only about six weeks behind the other Phase 3 buildings, Thackery said.

During the first week of December, the 11-month walkthroughs will take place at the Phase 1 schools, which are Prairie Norton, Alton Hall, Harmon and Monterey elementary schools, Dingeldein said.

The walkthroughs are scheduled just before the expiration of the industry-standard one-year warranties.

"We're preparing ourselves for saying we're closing the window of the first-year general warranties and when we do that, we want to make sure everything has made it to the list," Dingeldein said.

A preliminary walkthrough completed at each Phase 1 school over the summer allowed an unofficial warranty list to be compiled and about three-fourths of those items already have been addressed, he said.

The construction log at the Phase 2 buildings -- Darbydale, J.C. Sommer, Stiles, Finland and Bolton Crossing elementary schools -- still are active, Dingeldein said.

Twenty-seven items on that list have been rolled over to the list of warranty-covered issues, he said.

Those issues are typical in construction and the Phase 2 schools are "in relatively good shape," Dingeldein said.

The more-complex Franklin Heights High School project had a longer construction period than the elementary schools. Students are attending class at the school while the rest of the building project is completed, officials said.

The Franklin Heights building should be completely finished when students return after winter break, Thackery said.

Work on the tennis courts, soccer and band fields and the north entrance drive at the school should begin in the spring, he said.