Whitehall police arrested two girls, ages 14 and 13, for making false alarms, a first-degree misdemeanor, in connection with a bomb threat March 16 at Rosemore Middle School.

Whitehall police arrested two girls, ages 14 and 13, for making false alarms, a first-degree misdemeanor, in connection with a bomb threat March 16 at Rosemore Middle School.

Whitehall police Chief Mark Newcomb said Friday, March 18, the incident should serve as a "learning experience" for children and their parents.

"When you make poor decisions, there are consequences," Newcomb said.

"We hope parents and their children will use this as an opportunity to talk about decision-making and consequences."

Principal Rochelle Rankin called police at 11:30 a.m. March 16 to report "there was yet another bomb-threat writing on a restroom wall," according to reports.

Police were directed to the first-floor girls restroom at the school, 4800 Langley Ave.

Inside a stall were two phrases written on a tile: "I will bomb school" and "I'm bombing at 1:00 get ready," reports said.

Reports said police believed the writing "didn't have credibility" for several reasons, including a lack of any suspicious items, no signs of tampering, its similarity to a threat made at Rosemore the previous week, and a prior "copycat" threat at a Whitehall elementary school.

Newcomb confirmed a juvenile was arrested last week at Rosemore Middle School for inducing panic but deferred further questions about it and the incident at an elementary school to district officials.

Ty Debevoise, director of communications and marketing for Whitehall schools, said March 18 the district did not notify parents about the most recent threat "because it was immediately verified by police as an unfounded threat."

Classes remained undisturbed, he said.

Newcomb said police do not take control of a scene until a device is discovered; evacuations or other action are at the discretion of the district.

Police and school officials March 16 were investigating a report of students who had been discussing the written threats and reviewing the handwriting of all students when Rankin told police two students had confessed to writing the threats, police reports said.

The girls were taken in separate cars to the police station, and family members were advised.

The 14-year-old and her mother agreed to speak to police and told investigators "she didn't want to be at school" and that the other suggested writing a bomb threat.

The 14-year-old said she wrote, "I will bomb the school," and made a deliberate attempt to alter her handwriting.

She said she had handed a marker to the other girl, who wrote the second sentence.

The two girls then reported the writing to school administrators, police said.

The 13-year-old, who was interviewed with a family member, admitted to writing the phrase that indicated a time for the bombing, reports said.

When asked if she wanted out of school, she replied, "No, not really," police said. According to reports, she "really had no answers for her actions."

Reports said police found additional writing on a third-floor girls restroom, where police found the words, "I want to blow up the school," but the writing did not appear to match that of the two girls, police said.