Some residents and business owners have stepped up their fight to put the proposed West Dublin-Granville Road recreation path on the south side of the road.

Some residents and business owners have stepped up their fight to put the proposed West Dublin-Granville Road recreation path on the south side of the road.

A group called Safety First 161 recently sent a petition signed by 130 nearby residents and business owners to the city of Columbus, Mayor Michael Coleman and the Ohio Department of Transportation, asking that plans be changed to build the path on the relatively undeveloped south side of the road.

The proposed 10-foot-wide paved path for pedestrians and cyclists would be less safe on the north side of the road, where it would cross 38 intersections, roads and driveways, the opponents said.

The proposed path would stretch 2.2 miles from Linworth to Sawmill roads, with an estimated cost of $2.5 million. The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission in February announced that $2.3 million in federal funds would be funneled into the project.

Plans called for a 28-foot buffer between the roadway and the path, except in areas where that much space is not available, such as in front of businesses between Linworth Road and the railroad tracks.

Besides cutting across parking lots and entrances to many businesses, it would cut into the front lawns of the many homes on the north side of West Dublin-Granville Road.

Stan Apseloff lives at 2740 W. Dublin-Granville Road, not far from the Brookside Country Club. The proposed path would cut into the mound that provides privacy and safety for his home.

Every day, when he goes to the end of his driveway to get his mail, he waits for a break in traffic before approaching his mailbox, he wrote in a letter to the city and state last fall.

"Any notion that a shared-use bike path on Rt. 161 will become a place where people will walk and ride in comfort to and fro is simply not reality, unless the path is on the south side and there are trees between the road and the pedestrians," he wrote.

Engineers said a year ago that they had looked at the south side of the street but had not really studied it.

The north-side path would connect the most commuters with the most commerce, officials told ThisWeek in June 2012.

It also would save the bulk of commuters from having to cross Dublin-Granville Road, as most housing is on the north side of the road.

Opponents contend that crossings with flashing signals could be built to assist pedestrians and cyclists in crossing to the south side.