After an overwhelming attendance by Crandall Drive residents at Worthington City Council's April 20 meeting, city leaders will begin researching whether to install sidewalks for the High Street-adjacent street.

After an overwhelming attendance by Crandall Drive residents at Worthington City Council's April 20 meeting, city leaders will begin researching whether to install sidewalks for the High Street-adjacent street.

Council member Doug Smith met with Crandall Drive residents to discuss their interest in sidewalks, he said, and found that many are in favor of the construction.

Several speakers at the meeting raised such issues as children walking to school, access for people with physical disabilities and ease of High Street access, and staff members prepared a preliminary plan for how the sidewalk construction might occur.

According to the staff reports, construction of a 5-foot-wide concrete sidewalk would cost nearly $500,000, and the residents who want sidewalks requested that the city pay for the entirety of the project.

Many residents at the meeting said they don't want a sidewalk infringing on their properties. Some said they moved to the area specifically for the larger lawns and lack of sidewalks, whereas others expressed concern about infringing on landscaping and trees.

After hearing more than an hour of opinions and concerns from various residents, council members decided to look into it further. Ideas ranging from traffic-calming devices to a mixed-use path were discussed, and council members asked that while staff members prepare various options, they also look into making the intersection of Crandall and Ridgedale Drive a four-way stop in an attempt to slow traffic.

Although Crandall residents seemed convinced that a stop sign would be the bare necessity, City Manager Matt Greeson said recent traffic studies haven't supported such a conclusion. Despite that, he said, the city has options to move ahead with stop signs anyway.

"(The study's conclusion) doesn't mean that these residents don't have legitimate concerns because they're the ones that walk and bike on the road and experience it on a daily basis," Greeson said.

Council member David Norstrom asked staff members to be swift in their research and expressed his concerns about the residents' safety claims.

"All we need is to have one child hit by a car, and we'll be asking why we didn't have sidewalks in place," he said.

Council member Scott Myers reminded council and residents that the sidewalk would not be inexpensive and noted some similarities to the recent requests made by a community group in favor of purchasing space for a park in the Showe property development.

"I'm fresh off telling a community group that we couldn't afford $200,000; now I'm being asked to spend $500,000," he said. "I was here when we had $1 million in our reserve fund, and that was kind of a scary time."

Greeson said staff members should determine whether the four-way stop could serve as a temporary measure -- until one of council's May meetings -- while work to investigate path and sidewalk options continues.