Residents of Crandall Drive came to Worthington City Council in April to request that the city construct sidewalks along their street.

Residents of Crandall Drive came to Worthington City Council in April to request that the city construct sidewalks along their street.

Although city staff still is looking into that possibility, City Council has attempted to placate residents with a stop sign, despite advice to the contrary by staff members.

When they addressed council in April, residents voiced concerns about traffic moving too fast on the 25-mph street.

Council members indicated they needed more information before making decisions on the sidewalks, but told residents that stop signs were a possibility at Crandall's intersections with Ridgedale Drive and Morning Street.

But when the Worthington Division of Police prepared a report on actual speeds along Crandall at the end of April, they found that more than half of drivers in the area actually were driving below the speed limit, and overall, 85 percent of drivers were traveling less than 29 miles per hour.

Service and Engineering Director William Watterson said the concern with the stop signs is rear-ending accidents due to drivers being unaware that the stops exist.

Police Chief James Mosic also was against the installation of a sign.

"Stop-sign violations are one of our main complaints in a neighborhood," he said. "My thought is, if you put too many in a general area, the public is less likely to observe those."

Eventually, council members decided to go ahead with the sign at Crandall and Ridgedale despite staff concerns. At just $250 per sign, they said, it was a bargain.

"Based on what the residents have indicated, (the street) feels unsafe," Councilman David Norstrom said. "For $500, we can make it feel safer."