After promising to invest more than $6 million in Worthington, Trivium Development LLC President Tim Spencer said he believes a potential charter amendment on the Nov. 3 ballot could hinder similar investments in the future.

After promising to invest more than $6 million in Worthington, Trivium Development LLC President Tim Spencer said he believes a potential charter amendment on the Nov. 3 ballot could hinder similar investments in the future.

Spencer purchased an aging building at 350 W. Wilson Bridge Road, in an important area for Worthington, for just under $2 million in September. He plans to spend more than $4 million more to renovate the site into a medical facility, with the Central Ohio Urology Group already on board.

The proposed Worthington charter amendment, known as Issue 38 on the Nov. 3 ballot, would give residents 60 days to petition for a referendum on zoning decisions made by City Council, a 40-day increase on the current time limit.

The issue was placed on the ballot after the group Keep Worthington Beautiful circulated a petition earlier this year.

Spencer said he understands the group's concerns but believes the issue "is probably going to be a detriment" if passed.

"I think I see both sides of the positions," he said. "The residents want to feel informed and empowered, but I will tell you that I live by the mantra that 'time kills all deals.' If (the amendment) happens and that's the rules going forward, as a developer, you have to adapt to that and make it work."

Spencer doesn't have to go through a rezoning process for his site, but said others in the area could have reason for concern.

"Our property is zoned and we're pumping money into it ... so we're doing something that's a little less controversial," he said.

"But a rezoning matter, like that involving the (former United Methodist Children's Home) site, I think that hurts progress on the site. Even though you know it, the added time does not bode for a favorable outcome."

Worthington City Council officially opposed the charter amendment at its Sept. 8 meeting.

Council members and city staff cited the city's improved status as a welcoming place for developers as one of their concerns. The longer petition period could undo the work done to make Worthington attractive, they said.

Spencer agreed that the city has become an attractive location for development.

"The city manager's office and (former economic development manager) Jeff Harris have been very accommodating and open to ideas," he said. "We've got three or four layers to get this done at Wilson Bridge Road, so that has demonstrated a willingness to work together."