Everybody's got secrets, and some are bigger than others. But when people try to hide them, that's when things get interesting – certainly awkward – and funny, at least to the performers at Shadowbox Live.

CORRECTION: Because of a reporter's error, Brandon Anderson was misidentified in a caption in the print and earlier online version of this story.

Everybody’s got secrets, and some are bigger than others. But when people try to hide them, that’s when things get interesting – certainly awkward – and funny, at least to the performers at Shadowbox Live.

“Dirty Little Secrets,” the theater company’s sketch comedy and rock ’n’ roll show, opens at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 28, and runs select Fridays and Saturdays through June 8 at 503 S. Front St. in Columbus’ Brewery District.

Tickets may be purchased at shadowboxlive.org, at the box office or by calling 614-416-7625.

“The way I like to think about it is it celebrates misbehavior because people are naughty,” said Katy Psenicka, chief operations officer, chief choreographer and performer at Shadowbox.

The performance includes eight sketches interspersed with live music appropriate for the situation, Psenicka said.

She provides the voiceover in one sketch, in which a timid woman at a bar is trying to work up the courage to talk to a young man. But a rowdy group of drunk young women have her retreating from her objective.

“All the while, she’s kind of surrounded by chaos that’s interrupting her attempt to open up and get the confidence to talk to this handsome man sitting next to her,” Psenicka said.

A popular blue pill factors into another performance, in which Michael (Jimmy Mak) has made plans for a romantic anniversary celebration with his wife, played by Amy Lay.

When things start to kick in, so to speak, her parents drop by, followed by the landlord, followed by a newscaster reporting on a calamity in the neighborhood. All the while, Michael is trying to hide his physical affection for his wife.

When the evening calms down, he is comforted by the fact he has the assistance of another pharmaceutical intervention.

After he takes it, everyone comes barging back in, Psenicka said.

“There’s a lot of physical comedy in this one,” she said.

Mak said every sketch show is a challenge because the subject of sex has been lampooned so many times.

“I think that we all have dirty little secrets, so I think it’s fun to explore those and make fun of it in ways people can relate to,” he said.

geman@thisweeknews.com

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