Prairie Township officials hope to address speeding and cut-through traffic on a Lincoln Village street.

Trustees voted unanimously March 13 to spend up to $10,000 to purchase and install two temporary rubber speed humps along North Grener Avenue to slow drivers.

"If they do have the impact that we desire, then we could take those up and put in permanent (speed) humps," township Administrator Rob Peters said.

The township will be able to use the temporary speed humps in other locations for traffic calming or during community events, Peters said.

Prairie Township also has deployed its traffic trailer, which captures daily vehicle counts and rates of speed.

The township last year paid Stantec Consulting $4,000 for a traffic study of North Grener Avenue between Garden Heights Avenue and Beacon Hill Road.

The analysis found North Grener averages about 1,700 vehicles per day.

"We're clearly getting more traffic than just the people that live in that neighborhood -- most of our residential streets get 200 to 300 cars a day," Peters said.

Stantec's study found the 85th percentile speed -- meaning the speed at or below which 85 percent of cars was traveling -- was 29.6 mph. The posted speed limit on the residential street is 25 mph.

Stantec presented several possibilities for traffic calming:

* Modify the intersection at North Grener and Garden Heights avenues to close the north leg to all but emergency vehicles.

* Modify the intersection at North Grener Avenue and Beacon Hill Road to close the south leg to all but emergency vehicles.

* Modify the intersection at North Grener and Garden Heights avenues to implement a right-in, right-out diversion island on the north leg, while maintaining access for emergency vehicles.

* Add traditional traffic-calming devices to reduce speeds on North Grener Avenue such as raised intersections, speed bumps, speed humps and/or bump-outs.

Stantec recommended the township consider traffic-calming devices instead of restricting traffic on North Grener Avenue.

"The closure of a road is the most drastic of options to calm traffic and is often the most annoying to residents and the most difficult and costly to implement," the report said.

"These temporary speed humps can remain in place until the township and residents are satisfied with their performance, at which point permanent speed humps can be installed during a resurfacing project."

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