A withdrawn appeal means a modular-classroom building at Evening Street Elementary School will proceed as planned, according to Worthington Schools leaders.

Worthington City Council on June 3 accepted the withdrawal of an appeal filed by two residents against the Worthington Architectural Review Board’s April 25 approval of the modular at the school, 885 Evening St.

Lee Brown, director of planning and building for Worthington, said the school district has an approved building permit and may start construction. He said the ARB would revisit the case in four years to determine if the modular building still were needed.

John and Jenna Reik, who live on the 800 block of Evening Street, filed the appeal May 3, listing several reasons why they disagree with the ARB’s approval of the modular classrooms. The modular building at the school, would have six classrooms and two restrooms and would be 70 feet wide by 80 feet long, according to a March 28 plan presented to the ARB.

On May 13, City Council tabled a decision on whether to hear the appeal, delaying the decision to June 3.

Jenna Reik said the couple submitted a withdrawal letter to the city May 30. She said they had no further comments, other than what was stated in their letter withdrawing the appeal.

The letter, which was provided in City Council’s June 3 agenda packet, said the couple still disagreed with the placement of the modular building, but they recognized “there is nothing City Council can do to change that ... ”

According to their appeal, the Reiks had said their primary concerns were the modular building was not the closest proximity to the school and it would negatively affect surrounding properties by its closeness to Evening Street and its eight air-conditioning and heating units.

Jeff Eble, director of business services for Worthington Schools, had said April 25 that district leaders would not compromise on the position of the building after ARB members discussed moving it back farther from the street and out of view of nearby residents. The reason, he said at the time, was the proposed location provided a clear sight line for when children are playing outdoors.

The Reiks also wrote in their appeal-withdrawal letter they were satisfied school district leaders agreed to plant additional trees and remove a chain-link fence that was in question.

In an email to city officials included with their appeal, the Reiks had said the fence should be replaced and more street trees should be planted, which would help screen air-conditioning and heating units.

Eble said the modulars at Evening Street should be completed by the end of July.

He said other school buildings in the district also will add modular classrooms:

• McCord Middle School, 1500 Hard Road in Columbus, will gain four classrooms.

• Bluffsview Elementary, 7111 Linworth Road in Columbus, will gain two classrooms.

• Worthington Hills Elementary, 1221 Candlewood Drive in Columbus, will gain two classrooms.

Those projects also are expected to be completed by the end of July, Eble said.

“All of them at this point are on schedule,” he said.

The modular classrooms are needed to help with increasing enrollment, Worthington Schools leaders have said.

As of a January 2019 enrollment report on worthington.k12.oh.us, district enrollment was 10,276 but is projected to reach 11,546 by the 2024-25 school year.

ominnier@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekOlivia

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Previous story:

Worthington City Council on June 3 accepted the withdrawal of an appeal against the Worthington Architectural Review Board’s April 25 approval of modular classrooms at Evening Street Elementary School, 885 Evening St.

John and Jenna Reik, who live on the 800 block of Evening Street, filed the appeal May 3, listing several reasons why they disagree with the ARB’s April 25 approval of the modular classrooms. The modular building at the school, would have six classrooms and two restrooms and would be 70 feet wide by 80 feet long, according to a March 28 plan presented to the ARB.

On May 13, City Council tabled a decision on whether to hear the appeal, delaying the decision to June 3.

Jenna Reik said the couple submitted a withdrawal letter to the city May 30. She said they had no further comments, other than what was provided in their letter.

The letter, which was provided in City Council’s June 3 agenda packet, said the couple still disagreed with the placement of the modular building, but they recognized “there is nothing City Council can do to change that … ”

They also wrote in the letter they were satisfied the school district agreed to plant additional trees and remove a chain-link fence that was in question.

Read the full story in the June 6 edition of the ThisWeek Worthington News or check ThisWeekNEWS.com/Worthington for updates.

ominnier@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekOlivia