Worthington’s community-visioning project has taken another step forward.

Worthington City Council on Oct. 21 approved entering into a contract with the chosen consultant for the city’s community-visioning project.

The vote was 7-0.

Council chose Poggemeyer Design Group on July 15 as the consultant for the process.

Poggemeyer will work with a committee of residents to gather input from the community on how to envision Worthington’s future, according to council President Bonnie Michael.

Michael said the results would be used to guide policy and development decisions for the next 10 to 15 years.

According to documents from the meeting, City Manager Matt Greeson is permitted to enter into an agreement with Poggemeyer not to exceed $140,000 for the scope of services.

The proposed services, according to documents from Poggemeyer, are listed in seven phases. Each phase consists of tasks to be completed, such as a project design phase, in which the visioning committee will work with the consultant to finalize a communications plan and a public-involvement plan.

From there, the group will move into the listening and learning phase, in which it will gain ideas from gathering demographic information.

The last three phases of the project – collaborative input, visioning and public review/final adoption – will involve setting up focus groups and workshops, interpreting information from those groups and workshops and then finalization and city implementation.

City spokesperson Anne Brown said the process has no set timeline and the visioning committee wants to keep the timeline open.

Council named the 13 members of the visioning committee June 24.

Laura Abu-Absi, Kathryn Burris, Paul Cynkar, Cynthia Findlay, Matt Lees, Jon Melchi, Linda Mercadante, Jack Miner, Austin Mitchell, Don Mottley, Joe Sherman, Beth Sommer and Graham Wood are the 13 residents who were selected to serve on the committee, according to Brown.

Lauren Falcone, a vice president for Poggemeyer, said last week the company hoped council would approve the contract so the process could move forward.

“We’re excited to get started,” she said.

Jack Miner, vice chairman of the visioning committee, said in terms of the contract, a large portion focuses on the work the committee will do with the company to perform community outreach.

He said the committee and Poggemeyer plan to conduct interviews with community members and hold forums, and they have looked at software to allow community members to provide feedback that way.

Falcone said the groups have been working on a public-engagement plan so community members know when and where to be to participate.

She said residents are welcome to attend the visioning committee’s meetings on the second Tuesdays and fourth Mondays of every month from 6 to 9 p.m. in the second-floor meeting room of the municipal building.

“We’ve had a couple of members of the public present at every meeting, which has been great,” Falcone said.

ominnier@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekOlivia

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Contract for Worthington's visioning consultant up for vote Oct. 21

Worthington’s community-visioning committee has asked Worthington City Council to approve a contract for a consultant so the process can move forward, according to a release the group sent Friday, Oct. 18.

Council is expected to vote on a resolution for an “agreement with Poggemeyer Design Group for services related to community visioning” at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21, at the Worthington Municipal Building, 6550 N. High St., according to the council agenda.

Council on July 15 chose Poggemeyer Design Group as their consultant for the process. The consultant will work with a committee of residents to gather input from the community on how to envision Worthington’s future, according to council President Bonnie Michael.

Michael said the results would be used to guide policy and development decisions for the next 10 to 15 years.

Council named the 13 members of the visioning committee June 24.

They are Laura Abu-Absi, Kathryn Burris, Paul Cynkar, Cynthia Findlay, Matt Lees, Jon Melchi, Linda Mercadante, Jack Miner, Austin Mitchell, Don Mottley, Joe Sherman, Beth Sommer and Graham Wood, according to Anne Brown, spokesperson for the city.

Lauren Falcone, a vice president for Poggemeyer, said the firm is hoping council approves the contract so the process can move forward.

“We’re excited to get started,” she said.

Jack Miner, vice chairman of the visioning committee, said the committee met as a whole a few times and has focused on figuring out the details of the contract with Poggemeyer.

He said city leaders have seen a few drafts of the contract.

“It was an opportunity for us to make sure we’re aligned with the scope and the process,” Miner said.

He said in terms of the contract, a large portion focuses on the work the committee will do with the company to perform community outreach.

Miner said the committee and Poggemeyer plan to conduct interviews with community members and hold forums, and they have looked at software to allow community members to provide feedback that way.

“Ultimately, the vendor is helping us facilitate that process,” he said.

Falcone said the groups have been working on a public-engagement plan so community members know when and where to be to participate.

She said residents are welcome to attend the visioning committee’s meetings on the second Tuesdays and fourth Mondays of every month from 6 to 9 p.m. in the second-floor meeting room of the municipal building.

“We’ve had a couple of members of the public present at every meeting, which has been great,” Falcone said.

Miner said he would give a presentation to council at the public hearing Oct. 21.

ominnier@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekOlivia