Under Hilliard’s new city-manager form of government, Andy Teater will serve as Hilliard’s mayor for 2020 in addition to president of Hilliard City Council.

Teater was elected as council president and Pete Marsh was retained as vice president, both by 7-0 votes Jan. 6.

Teater replaces Kelly McGivern, who said previously she would not seek to retain her office as president, which she had held for two years.

Each office is for a one-year term; in the past, the terms were for two years.

Last November, voters approved a battery of amendments that included decreasing the term of council president from two years to one year and adding the duties of the symbolic mayor for the council president and vice mayor for the vice president who is Marsh.

In November 2018, voters approved another charter amendment that changed the city’s form of government from that of a strong mayor to a city manager, effective Jan 1.

“I’m excited to be in this position as we continue our transition to a city manager," Teater said. "My goal is to work as a team. We might not always agree, but we will communicate."

With the change in form of government, the mayor now “shall act as the ceremonial head of the government (and) shall be recognized as the official head of the municipality for the purpose of serving civil process and shall have all the judicial powers granted to a mayor of a municipal corporation by the laws of the state of Ohio,” according to section 2.14 of the charter.

The charter says the mayor may vote but has no veto authority and shall appoint a magistrate to act in Mayor’s Court unless the mayor is an attorney and has council approval to preside.

The mayor also is authorized to declare a public disaster and exercise military power and functions granted mayors under state or federal law, according to the charter.

Although the duties of the mayor are enumerated in the city charter, when asked how he would approach the new role of a ceremonial mayor, Teater acknowledged a learning curve but that his focus is being council president.

“It’s a ceremonial position," he said. "My focus is as council president but I’m still just one of seven members."

Also on Jan. 6, council members reappointed Lynne Fasone as council clerk, and three recently elected council members were sworn in.

Marsh, Omar Tarazi and Cynthia Vermillion were elected in November.

State Sen. Stephanie Kunze (R-Hilliard) administered the oath of office to Marsh and Tarazi, and state Rep. Allison Russo (D-Upper Arlington) administered the oath to Vermillion.

Vermillion is the first Democrat elected to Hilliard City Council since 1989.

Marsh and Tarazi were elected to full four-year terms after being appointed in early 2018 and 2019, respectively.

City Manager Michelle Crandall, who was sworn in Jan. 2, presided at her first council meeting during its organizational session and then a regular meeting that followed it.

Crandall acknowledged council’s effort to create the position, campaign for the charter amendment and then identify and interview candidates.

“I thank you for the opportunity to be your first city manager,” said Crandall, who served as the assistant city manager as Dublin before accepting the job.

Crandall has a three-year contract, and as city manager, she oversees the daily operations of the city, including department directors.

Crandall’s three-year contract provides an annual salary of $176,000, city spokesman David Ball said previously.

Her benefits are equal to about 40% of her salary, approximately the same for all city employees, David Delande, Hilliard’s finance director, said in September. That amount would be $70,400, making her total compensation $246,400 per year.

kcorvo@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekCorvo

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Hilliard City Council will elect a new president and vice president at an organizational meeting scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 6, at the Hilliard Municipal Building, 3800 Municipal Way.

Council President Kelly McGivern said she will not seek to retain her office as president, which she has held for two years.

The vice president is Pete Marsh.

Each office is for a one-year term; in the past, the terms were for two years.

For the first time, the council president also will serve as the city’s symbolic mayor, McGivern said.

In November 2018, voters approved a charter amendment that changed the city’s form of government from that of a strong mayor to a city manager, effective Jan 1.

Voters also approved a battery of other amendments that included decreasing the term of council president from two years to one year and adding the duties of the symbolic mayor.

Council will meet in a regular session at 7 p.m., following the organizational meeting.

Check ThisWeekNEWS.com/Hilliard for updates.

kcorvo@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekCorvo