In response to the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, schools in Bexley are either closed for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year or transitioning to online learning.

Gov. Mike DeWine on March 12 ordered that all Ohio schools be closed for three weeks starting at the end of the school day on March 16. In addition, Bexley Mayor Ben Kessler announced on March 15 that one of the confirmed coronavirus cases in Ohio was a Bexley resident.

The Bexley City School District is preparing a distance-learning plan for students that is scheduled to begin March 30 and is awaiting guidance from DeWine and the Ohio Department of Education on how standardized testing might be handled and if students would have to make up any days beyond the school year, district spokesman Tyler Trill said.

“We are preparing to provide technology resources to the students and families that need them. The district will reach out to families to notify them of this process in the coming days,” he said. “The district has notified our staff members of the expectations and requirements during the closure.”

Starting the week of March 24, Trill said, students who receive free and reduced-price lunches would be able to pick up multiple meals twice a week from these locations: Cassingham Complex, south parking lot, 348 S. Cassingham Road; Maryland Elementary School, staff parking lot, 2754 Maryland Ave.; Montrose Elementary School, Remington Road parking lot, 2555 E. Main St.; and Schneider Park, 2130 Astor Ave. Details are available at

bexleyschools.org/Food

ServicesEZpay.aspx.

According to the district’s website, bexleyschools.org, all indoor gatherings have been canceled and the district plans to contact parents with further details about programming as they become available.

Private schools in Bexley are also preparing distance-learning plans for students, according to information provided by Capital University, 1 College and Main, St. Charles Preparatory School, 2010 E. Broad St., and Columbus School for Girls, 65 S. Drexel Ave.

St. Charles spokesman Louis Fabro forwarded a March 11 letter from the Catholic Diocese of Columbus indicating the diocese is developing plans to provide off-site, digital instruction to students.

“We will all continue to act with an abundance of caution to protect the health and safety of our students, parents, staff, and all whom we come in contact,” Superintendent of Catholic Schools Adam Dufault said.

Columbus School for Girls spokesperson Brittany Westbrook said the school has distance-learning plans in place that the school can provide to students through the end of the school year.

“Using a variety of applications, teachers are prepared to host classes virtually with students, and younger students, ages 3 to kindergarten, were sent home with materials, plans, schedules and activities,” Westbrook said. “Cancellation of large gatherings beyond the current closure will be considered on a case-by-case basis in line with mandates from health and government officials.”

As a private school, CSG is not affected by prekindergarten through 12th grade standardized tests and does not anticipate students having to make up missed days, Westbrook said.

“Our college counselors are working with students who were scheduled to take college-entrance exams,” she said.

Capital University announced March 16 the university would close its traditional residence halls and request students return to their primary residences, with move-out processes completed by March 22.The university is extending remote learning for all students through the end of the spring semester, Capital president Beth Paul said.

“While there are no confirmed cases of the virus on our campuses, it is integral to align with state and federal regulations to help slow the spread of COVID-19,” Paul said. “Our primary goal is to maintain the safety and well-being of our community, and also continue to support the learning goals and success of our students – as much as possible – while we all navigate these unprecedented waters.”

Capital is working with students who have a need for housing by utilizing university apartments and houses that allow for social distancing, according to a university news release. Additionally, the university will issue prorated room and board credits for those impacted by residence hall closures.

Capital started carry-out only services at its on-campus dining facilities and the university’s on-campus fitness centers have ceased operation through at least April 6, the news release stated. The spring athletic season has been canceled, in accordance with the Ohio Athletic Conference.

Ongoing updates are available at capital.edu/coronavirus. 

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