Dublin officials are planning to relocate and improve the city's World War II monument by Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

Matt Earman, Dublin's director of parks and recreation, said the proposed plan is the result of many discussions with members of the city's veterans committee.

"Their involvement with this project made it possible," Earman said.

According to an Aug. 18 memo to Dublin City Council, the monument is on the southeast corner of the parking lot at the Dublin City School District's 1919 building, 150 W. Bridge St.

The plan is to replace the stone memorial and move it to the western edge of Dublin's Veterans Park off North High Street. Earman said the new location would be just a few hundred yards from the current one, which doesn't provide much visibility.

Weather deteriorated the monument's limestone near the bottom. The city will replace it with a new memorial with a design inspired by the current one, he said.

City officials are designing the monument in-house and hopes to receive manufacturing and installation quotes soon, Earman said.

The cost for the project, which includes the monument, base, foundation and landscaping, is estimated at about $37,000, he said.

Earman said he hopes to have the project completed before Veterans Day, Nov, 11.

Earman said the city began looking into moving and replacing the monument after the Dublin Historical Society approached the city with concerns.

Tom Holton, the society's historian, said the marker is in a position that is hidden from public view.

"Very few people knew it was there," he said.

The new location will offer the marker a place of honor, Holton said.

"It will be a respectful spot," he said.

Working to relocate the marker, he said, was a promise he'd made to Dublin resident Jim Richards, who was dedicated to remembering veterans. Richards died in January.

"I promised Jim that I would do something about it if I could," Holton said.

The current marker is the third one memorializing Washington Township residents' participation in World War II, Holton said. The first was outside the 1919 building and had glass doors which could be opened to place names of men and women as they left to serve in the war, Holton said.

After the war, that marker was taken down, and the names of those who served were placed onto a board inside the 1919 building, Holton said.

The current marker has that same list of names, he said

"This is one of those stories that needs to stay alive, somehow," he said.

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