Columbus' North Market planning summer of fun for downtown location

Gary Seman Jr.
ThisWeek group
This is a scene from a farmers market held last year at the North Market, 59 Spruce St. downtown. The farmers market, yoga and socially oriented Night Market all are part of this year's summer event series.

Yoga classes, a farmers market and a socially oriented Night Market all are part of this year's summer event series at the North Market, 59 Spruce St. in downtown Columbus.

The series was one of the few citywide events that was not canceled last year because of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Yoga classes, led by Heartfelt Yoga Studio, will be held 9 to 10 a.m. every other Sunday through Sept. 19 outdoors on the market plaza. The next class is May 16. 

Tickets are available for the series or single classes.

For information or to purchase tickets, go to northmarket.org/events/yoga-at-the-market-downtown/.

The biggest North Market attraction is the farmers market, to be held 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays from June 5 to Oct. 30.

The market will feature more than 25 vendors selling fresh produce, snacks, baked goods, jewelry, artisan soups and environmentally friendly goods and services.

New to the market are Kempf Acres/Our Farm Food Club, known for its fresh strawberries; Leafy Products, selling eco-friendly paper products for the home; Stokeshire Farm, offering eggs, produce, fruit and a multitude of other a wide variety of things; and Rewash Refillery, where the owners pull up in their van and feature soaps and other eco-friendly products and refill empty bottles so customers don’t have to purchase new containers.

Vicky and Bill Thomas of the Thomas Family Orchard in Philo, near Zanesville, will make their 32nd appearance at the market.

Vicky Thomas said they intend to bring apples, seedless table grapes and cider to the market from August through the end of the season.

“We find that the North Market helps us get a lot more out of our crop,” she said. “If we stay in Muskingum County, we don’t get the value out of our crop.”

Jillian Woltz, director of programming and events for the North Market, said officials had put many safety protocols in place last year, including appropriately distancing vendors from each other and mandatory facial coverings for vendors and patrons.

“Actually, it was one of the most successful farmers markets we had,” Woltz said. “I think it was a safe and responsible way to shop. It was outside. It feels a little safer than going to a big grocery story, for example.

“We’re going to roll out the same things we did last year” in terms of safety, she said.

Also on the agenda is Night Market, a monthly market to be held 6 to 9 p.m. June 18, July 16, Aug. 20, Sept. 17 and Oct. 15.

Woltz said they are inspired by traditional outdoor markets and provide an opportunity for customers to purchase directly from local entrepreneurs.

Festivities will include independent hand-made and locally grown products for sale, live music, games, adult drinks from Barrel and Bottle and food from select North Market merchants.  

“North Market comes alive outdoors during the summer, thanks to our farmers, local makers and community partnerships,” said Rick Harrison Wolfe, executive director of the North Market. “We're thrilled for the return of our beloved farmers market and Night Market as well as the addition of the new yoga at the market.” 

gseman@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekGary