Grandview Heights Moment in Time

ThisWeek group
Several noted professional photographers resided in Grandview Heights in the early history of the community, including one of the city's founders, George Urlin, and his partner, John Pfeifer. Fred A. Behmer started working as a photographer in 1901 when he was 16, working for Baker Art Gallery and later the Columbus Star, a weekly tabloid published by the Wolfe family. His famous work includes photos of Company B of the Ohio National Guard deployed at Camp Willis in what is now Upper Arlington. For more than 50 years, Behmer was the staff photographer for Jeffery Manufacturing, charged with documenting the company's activities and the service of Jeffrey employees. Behmer was the first photographer to record the Ohio State football team's away games for publication in the next morning's paper. According to his granddaughter, Pat Behmer Preble, he dried the photo plates on a potbelly stove on the return train trip from the game so that they would be ready for the newspaper. This photo shows Behmer (left) and an unidentified friend dressed for the annual Field Day celebration in 1916.

Editor's note: The caption is repeated below for easier reading.

Several noted professional photographers resided in Grandview Heights in the early history of the community, including one of the city's founders, George Urlin, and his partner, John Pfeifer.

Fred A. Behmer started working as a photographer in 1901 when he was 16, working for Baker Art Gallery and later the Columbus Star, a weekly tabloid published by the Wolfe family.

His famous work includes photos of Company B of the Ohio National Guard deployed at Camp Willis in what is now Upper Arlington.

For more than 50 years, Behmer was the staff photographer for Jeffery Manufacturing, charged with documenting the company's activities and the service of Jeffrey employees.

Behmer was the first photographer to record the Ohio State football team's away games for publication in the next morning's paper.

According to his granddaughter, Pat Behmer Preble, he dried the photo plates on a potbelly stove on the return train trip from the game so that they would be ready for the newspaper.

This photo shows Behmer (left) and an unidentified friend dressed for the annual Field Day celebration in 1916.