Roundabout construction at Scioto Darby and Walcutt roads slated for 2021

A. Kevin Corvo
ThisWeek group
Construction is expected to begin next year on a single-lane roundabout at Scioto Darby and Walcutt roads in Hilliard to replace the T intersection and traffic signal there.

Construction is expected to begin next year on a single-lane roundabout at Scioto Darby and Walcutt roads in Hilliard to replace the T intersection and traffic signal there.

The project will cost Hilliard about 20% less than expected, said Letty Schamp, the city’s deputy engineer.

The city engineer’s estimate for the project was $1.92 million, but Delaware-based Trucco Construction Co. submitted the low bid of $1.54 million among the eight companies that submitted bids on the project, Schamp said.

The eight bids were more than usual and likely a product of the city’s policy to allow companies to submit bid packages online, she said.

Trucco Construction Co. built the roundabout at Scioto Darby and Leppert roads in 2019.

“I am confident in the quality of their work,” Schamp said.

A construction schedule has not been submitted, but the project is required to be complete at the end of 2021, she said.

The project includes construction of a shared-use pedestrian and recreational path along the south side of Scioto Darby Road between the Scioto Farms and Darby Glen subdivisions, Schamp said.

The new roundabout is expected to improve traffic flow not only at the site but also at the four-way stop just to the east at Leap and Scioto Darby roads and Darby Glen Boulevard, she said.

That intersection is in the city of Columbus, but the new roundabout at Scioto Darby and Walcutt roads should alleviate some of the backup of westbound motorists waiting for vehicles to turn south on Walcutt Road.

Those westbound backups contribute to congestion at the four-way stop, Schamp said.

But any changes to the four-way stop at the entrance to the Darby Glen subdivision would be made by Columbus.

The project also will provide the Hilliard Public Arts Commission with a little more than $15,000.

In 2018, Hilliard City Council approved legislation to set aside 1% of the construction cost of qualifying capital-improvements projects to fund the acquisition or creation of public artwork.

Kelley Daniel, chair of the public-arts commission, said the the policy is a boon.

"We're thrilled," she said.

Like almost any other endeavor, the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has slowed the progress of the commission, but next year's objectives, made possible by such funding, include a call of artists to create a mural for the Hilliard Civic and Cultural Arts Center, a plan to paint certain utility structures in the city and public-art placement on city-owned land near Alton Darby Creek and Cosgray roads, Daniel said.

kcorvo@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekCorvo