Permit denied for apartments along Reynoldsburg's East Main Street

Kelley Rodriguez
ThisWeek
The Reynoldsburg Board of Building and Zoning Appeals on May 20 denied a conditional-use permit that would have allowed more than 100 apartments to be built alongside a 50,000-square-foot medical office building on East Main Street, near the Franklin/Licking county line.

The Reynoldsburg Board of Building and Zoning Appeals denied a conditional-use permit May 20 that would have allowed more than 100 apartments to be built alongside a 50,000-square-foot medical office building on East Main Street.   

The bulk of the 14.6-acre project proposed by the Homewood Corp. – more than 10 acres – was to be dedicated to 180 two- and three-bedroom apartments east of Carlyle Drive and across the street from Glen Rest Memorial Estate.   

The property falls along the Franklin/Licking county line in an area classified by the city’s comprehensive plan as the East Main Street District (EMD). The EMD is “intended to serve as a transportation corridor lined with compact, mixed-use development,” according to the 2018 plan. 

Homewood is in negotiations with a medical user who wants to build on the remaining four acres, company President Jim Lipnos said. 

Lipnos said the $24 million apartment complex was added to the proposal in an effort to meet the zoning code’s call for mixed-use development along East Main Street.  

As proposed, the 3-story Main Street Apartments included a pool, dog park, interior sidewalks and a clubhouse with rents starting at $1,200 a month, Lipnos said. 

The Homewood Corp. sought a variance to allow 378 parking spaces at the complex – enough for at least two spaces per apartment – well above the 216 required by city code. 

“These are not cheap, run-of-the-mill apartments,” Lipnos said. “I think we blend in with the neighborhood really well.” 

A half dozen people spoke against the proposal, including City Auditor Stephen Cicak and former City Council member Brett Luzader, who said the plan doesn’t meet the small retail and mixed-use residential developments intended under the city’s 2018 comprehensive plan.  

“I am not against apartments. But I am against this proposal,” Luzader said. “This is not what City Council or the residents were told when this property was rezoned. If you approve this application, I believe you are setting a dangerous precedent for development in Reynoldsburg.” 

The property is owned by the William C. Davis Trust/John C. Lucas, trustee. 

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